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Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
2011 Centennial Symposium on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

News and Events
Check our site frequently for upcoming news and events

December 13, 2011
Presentation Materials available
Please visit our Program page to download presentation materials.

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October 13, 2011
Presentation Program available
Please visit our Program page to view.

August 15, 2011
Call for Proposals Deadline Extended!
New deadline for proposals is Monday, September 5th

July 1, 2011
Symposium Keynotes Announced
for the 2011 Centennial Symposium include Stephen Brookfield, Stephen Chew, and Kathy Takayama

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June 21, 2011
Registration open
for the 2011 Centennial Symposium on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

2011
Call for Proposals
for the 2011 Centennial Symposium on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Program at a Glance

Poster May 2011 and subject to change.

2011 Forum

Thursday, November 10, 2011

TIME PLACE EVENT
11:30 am Hotel Foyer Reception Area Pre-Symposium registration
open until 1:30 pm
1:00 pm Black Bear Room Pre-Symposium Plenary Session
1:30 pm Black Bear Room and Lynx Salon Pre-Symposium Workshops
3:15 pm Black Bear Room Coffee Available
3:30 pm Black Bear Room and Lynx Salon Pre-Symposium Workshops
4:30 pm Hotel Foyer Reception Area Symposium registration
open until 6:00 pm
5:30 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Opening Reception
6:30 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Opening Banquet
7:30 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Opening Plenary Session
Stephen Brookfield

2011 Forum

Friday, November 11, 2011

TIME PLACE EVENT
7:00 am Chinook Buffet Breakfast
available until 10:00 am
8:00 am Hotel Foyer Reception Area Symposium registration
open until 3:30 pm
8:00 am Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Opening Plenary Session
8:30 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band “A”
9:30 am Alpine Meadows Reception Area Coffee Available
10:00 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band “B”
11:00 am Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Remembrance Day Commemoration
11:30 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band "C"
12:30 om Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Buffet Lunch
2:30 pm Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band “D”
3:30 pm Alpine Meadows Reception Area Coffee Available
4:00 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Plenary Session
Stephen Chew
5:30 pm Banff AB Dinner on your Own
7:00 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Scholars Reception
8:00 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Symposium Dance

2011 Forum

Saturday, November 12, 2011

TIME PLACE EVENT
7:00 am Chinook Buffet Breakfast
available until 10:00 am
8:00 am Hotel Foyer Reception Area Symposium registration
open until 3:30 pm
8:00 am Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Morning Plenary Session
8:30 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band “E”
9:30 am Alpine Meadows Reception Area Coffee Available
10:00 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band “F”
11:00 am Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Coffee Available
11:30 am Various Rooms
Concurrent Sessions
Band "G"
12:30 om Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Buffet Lunch
1:30 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Plenary Session
Kathy Takayama
3:00 pm Castle/Assiniboine Rooms Closing Plenary Session
2011 Forum

Program

Opening Reception
Thursday, November 10th from 5:30-6:30 pm

Thursday
5:30-6:30 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Please join us for an informal gathering at the beginning of our second Symposium. This is a perfect time to reconnect with friends and colleagues, meet other scholars of teaching and learning, and enjoy the company of our international participants. Wine, beer, and soft drinks will be provided by the Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at Mount Royal University.

Opening Banquet
Thursday, November 10th from 6:30-7:30 pm

Thursday
6:30-7:30 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Experience has taught us that beginning with an opening banquet provides for an easy entrée into the community and good work of the Symposium. This is a chance to get acquainted with new colleagues and above all, prepare for the rigor and excitement of the days to come. Wine, beer, and soft drinks will be provided by the Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at Mount Royal University.

Plenary Keynote Session
Thursday, November 10th from 7:30-9:00 pm

Thursday
7:30-9:30 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Becoming a Skillful Teacher
Stephen Brookfield (University of St. Thomas)

Skillful teachers attempt to find out how students experience learning and then use that information to make good pedagogic decisions. Without some knowledge of how our students are learning, the choices we make concerning how and what to teach are stabs in the dark. Teaching skillfully involves us deliberately placing ourselves in the role of student and reflecting on the experience of how we, and they, confront difficult and intimidating learning. In this speech Stephen Brookfield will draw on his autobiography as both learner and teacher to show how this frames four core assumptions of skillful teaching: that good teaching constitutes whatever helps students learn, that the most effective teachers reflect critically on their assumptions, that the most important pedagogic knowledge we need is an awareness of how our students learn, and, that context changes everything.

Radical Learning for a Just World - Stephen Brookfield

Following Stephen’s keynote there will be ample time for questions, comments, and conversation. We encourage you to engage with the idea and issues presented and spark a lively dialogue.

This keynote has been generously sponsored by Mount Royal University’s Vice President Academic and Vice President Student Affairs and Campus Life.

Breakfast Buffet

Friday, November 11
from 7:00-10:00 am
Chinook Buffet on the Mezzanine Level

Opening Plenary Session

Friday, November 11
from 8:00-8:30 am
Castle/Assiniboine Rooms on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band A
Friday, November 11th from 8:30-9:30 am

Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Aspen Room
Effectiveness of Term Project in Helping Students to Connect Theory with Practice:
A Case Study of ENVS 4413 Class

Israel Dunmade (Mount Royal University)

A term project is a hands-on assignment that asks students to apply ideas, theories, concepts, or principles learned or studied in class to a new situation/real life scenario. Term projects in ENVS 4413 are designed to help students connect theory with practice. The aim is to enhance students’ learning of the course materials and to give them experiential knowledge of how the course materials are applied in the workplace. Students’ survey, term project reports, and students’ online journals are among the data gathering methods used. They were incorporated components of the ENVS 4413 course. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used in analyzing how term project help students to connect theory with practice. The mixed methods used involve extraction of data from students’ online journal, survey, and term project report. The survey data was statistically analyzed to provide quantitative evidence on whether term project helps students to connect theory with practice or not. Journal and term project report also provided observational data for an explanation of survey findings. Data analysis showed that students found the term project helpful in connecting theory with practice. They found industrial visit to partnering companies to be the most interesting aspect of the term project. Data collection and conceptual model development was the least interesting aspect to them. It can be concluded that term project is helping in assuring the compliance of the Bachelor of Applied Environmental Science (BAES) degree program with the original program design and in facilitating the success of MRU’s BAES degree students.

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Birch Room
Trial by hire: Seven Stages of Learning to Teach in Higher Education
Patricia Post (University of New Brunswick)

This phenomenological study describes seven stages of learning to teach at the university level. Through the use of narratives, a number of Canadian university professors reveal their beliefs and attitudes about teaching and learning as they struggle to become better teachers within various academic settings. The purpose of the study was to develop a better understanding of self-directed and transformative learning as it relates to adults who engage in on-the-job-training. The initial data for ‘Trial by Hire’ were collected in the form of in-depth interviews or ‘learning –to-teach stories” from 12 maritime Canadian professors (six male and six female) from different academic fields and different universities at differing points in their academic careers. Since the initial data collection, follow-up interviews have been conducted with some of the initial participants. Data analysis resulted in eight themes which occurred in seven developmental stages: Warming, Forming, Informing, Storming, Performing, Reforming, and Transforming. The findings suggest that a better understanding of the stages of learning to teach in higher education could: 1) enable faculty to gain confidence in their teaching ability earlier on in their careers; 2) assist faculty developers to better meet the changing needs of faculty; and 3) guide administrators in their efforts to promote the scholarship of teaching and learning within their academic milieu.

Seven Stages of Learning to Teach in Higher Education Stage Indicator - Patricia Post
Themes and Stages in the Process of Learning to Teach in Higher Education - Patricia Post

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Cedar Room
An Examination of a Capstone Experience. Translating Marketing into Story
David Finch (Mount Royal University)

The relationship between theory and real-world experience has been a central debate in education for millennia (Kraft, 1991). Dewey (1958) argues that experience is the foundation of education. Scholars have defined experiential education as the process of incorporating real experience and consequence as a means to stimulate problem-solving skills (Dewey, 1938; Kraft, & Sakofs, 1988). This SoTL research project is exploring the theoretical foundations of experiential education and examining its relationship with student learning in a newly developed senior marketing capstone course (Marketing 4259 – Marketing Decision Making). It is the intersection of these two areas that will be the unique contribution to this discipline and offer an excellent platform for discussion. The course was designed based on Kolb’s (1984) experiential learning model with the goal of facilitating the merger of theory and practice. Therefore, Marketing 4259 combines critical literature readings, collaborative learning, and real-world application. A central objective of this course is to explore the multi-disciplinary nature of marketing. Effective marketers must possess lateral knowledge, that is, the ability to connect a broad range of unrelated information in order to solve problems and generate value. The ability to synthesize and integrate this information into solutions is foundational. However, the ability to translate this process into a coherent and persuasive story is essential to success. In summary, the research question: What is happening when students learn how to translate the individual elements of marketing into story as a capstone experience?

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Maple Room
An Orientation to Learning: A Pilot Project
Sheryl Boisvert (NorQuest College)
Margaret Wilson (NorQuest College)

This research project will measure the success of an Immersion Week that has been developed for Business Administration Diploma students at NorQuest College The full experience involves one week of preparing students for their studies at the beginning of the fall 2011 term. A shorter version of the experience will be used for the students starting in the January 2012 term. Immersion Week includes a general orientation to learning, relationship building, a faculty panel, study skills and time management information, assignment strategies, exam skills, a Dean’s breakfast and a group project. The goal is to motivate and influence students in the Business Administration Diploma program and have them come together as a group. Data will be collected from the students on their study skills and learning styles using LASSI, a validated tool, at the beginning of the fall term and then again at the end of the first term. Data will also be solicited from the Office of the Registrar in numerical form to determine program completion and attrition rates for Business Administration students for the two years prior to this intervention and for two years following the introduction of Immersion Week. This presentation details the rational for the activities during the Immersion Week and introduces LASSI, a learning and study skills inventory. Student comments on the fall 2011 Immersion Week will be shared.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Pine Room
Succeeding in Large Lecturer-Based Objectively Assessed Classes: Examining Surface versus Deep Approaches to Learning, Test-Taking Strategies, Anxiety, and Motivation
Maureen Drysdale (University of Waterloo)

This study explored deeper learning in a large lecture-based objectively-assessed course by examining the relationship between explicitly instructing students in deeper learning techniques and performance on multiple-choice tests. Furthermore, comparisons between a control group and an experimental group were examined to better understand the relationship between anxiety, motivation, study skills, objective assessments, and teacher strategies on students’ engagement in deeper learning and performance. Results indicated that students perform better if they have strong concentration skills, the ability to select key points from the course content, strong test taking skills, strong time management skills, are motivated, and have a positive academic attitude. Student performance tends to decrease with a more surface approach to learning, performance anxiety, and surprisingly – using self-testing techniques such as reviewing notes before and after class. Overall, anxiety was the strongest predictor of academic performance compared to all the other independent variables. Although students engaged in deeper learning t 2011 Centennial Symposium on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 10 more than surface learning, a surprising finding was that deeper learning and concentration decreased during the course of the term while surface learning and focusing on key points increased. Educational implications will be discussed.

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Willow Room
Has the Recent Emphasis on Reading Instruction Increased Teacher Knowledge of Phonemes, Phonics, Morphology, and Linguistics?
Sharyn N. Disabato (Saint Leo University)
Lin Carver (Saint Leo University)
Nancy Cerezo (Saint Leo University)
Keya Mukherjee (Saint Leo University)

Has the recent emphasis on reading instruction increased teacher knowledge of phonemes, phonics, morphology, and linguistics? Through of use of responders, participants will identify their knowledge base about phonemes, phonics, morphology, and linguistics. This information will be compared to teacher knowledge in these areas as indicated by data collected at a small liberal arts university using the Teacher Knowledge Survey designed by Louisa Moats (1996). A Teacher Perception Survey will be administered to the attendees’ to determine their perceptions. The results gathered at the session will be compared to those found in the current study. This study was conducted to determine whether the percentages of the responses were consistent with Moats’ findings in light of the recent emphasis on reading instruction. Preliminary data from the study confirms our first suspicion that teachers lack mastery of the requisite knowledge to differentiate instruction to meet students’ needs.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
8:30-9:30 am

Black Bear Room
Lessons About SoTL Support From Two Institutions
Marcel F D’Eon (University of Saskatchewan)
Damon Sakai (University of Hawaii)
Krista Trinder (University of Saskatchewan)
Brad Wutherick (University of Saskatchewan)

The John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) at the University of Hawaii recognized that their teaching faculty needed scholarly work to be eligible for promotion/tenure. They also sought research-supported evidence for the efficacy of the approaches they use themselves and advocate to an international audience. Beginning in January 2010 they engaged the support of an experienced researcher/consultant in medical education from another university. Eight studies were initiated and others moved forward resulting in two conference submissions and one manuscript accepted for publication. JABSOM will also host an annual local conference on medical education beginning in 2012 and a small regional conference by 2016. JABSOM has initiated monthly half-day “work bees” where faculty gather to work on scholarly projects and seek the consultant’s support. At the University of Saskatchewan the Centre for Discovery in Learning was launched in 2009 to help faculty from all programs engage productively in SoTL. Activities included a series of workshops on SoTL, small research grants, a local SoTL conference, monthly research seminars, and hosting a national conference on teaching and learning. The internal funding and SoTL workshop series resulted in several conference presentations and publications. Another local conference is being planned for the spring of 2012. The seminar series was not successful and is being recreated as a community of practice event with time for sharing and relationship building. During the conference session most of the time will be spent in discussion of important lessons learned from these experiences and possible application to other sites.

Use of Grouped Self-Assessments in Health Professions Program Evaluation

Category: Institutional/Program support and development

Back to Program

Coffee Available
Friday, November 11th from 9:30-10:00 am
Alpine Meadows Reception Area on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band B
Friday, November 11th from 10:00-11:00 am

Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Aspen Room
Making Sense of Social Research Methods Instruction: A Preliminary Reflection Regarding Journalism Students’ Valuation of Their Learning Experiences in Acquiring Social Science Research Skills
Maria Victoria Guglietti (Mount Royal University)
Amanda Williams (Mount Royal University)

This paper introduces our preliminary ideas for an investigation of journalism students’ valuation of their learning experiences in COMM 3737: Research Design and Methodology. The class was introduced in 2007 as a mandatory component of journalism studies in Mount Royal University’s Faculty of Communication. As long term instructors of this course we have struggled to make it meaningful to our learners, and are thus seeking a way to redesign the research methods course and evaluate the changes made in a systematic manner. At present there is a paucity of research on the outcomes and nature of social science research methods courses (Wagner, Garner & Kawulich, 2011). It has been recognized that, while there seems to be a general reticence among students to learn about research methods across all disciplines (Fife, 2008; Ransford & Butler, 1982; Stacks & Hickson, 1991), the problem may be aggravated among trainee practitioners (Aylor, 2001; Mersey, 2006; Nguyen & Lam, 2009). Our past experiences in the classroom support this idea. Our aim is thus to explore in greater depth why such learners perceive research skills as foreign to their profession and to assess which of our new teaching strategies (if any) they feel will prepare them for their future as journalists. Our presentation will include a brief review of the existing literature, discuss past teaching strategies used in this specific class and students’ responses to them, and conclude by reviewing our plan for measuring journalism students’ valuation of their learning experience.

Category: Calls for collaboration, triangulation, and development
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Birch Room
Understanding Why and How Students Apply Learning Strategies
Catharine Lindland (Mount Royal University)

Students often enter university with a limited understanding about themselves as learners and the different strategies needed to succeed in post-secondary. UGST 1001: Effective Learning in the Undergraduate Context is a course about learning how to learn and developing self-regulated learners. To help students realize the control they have over their own learning, this course is based on Zimmerman’s (2000) theory of self-regulation. Research in this area has shown that students’ reasons for studying play an important role in their views of strategy usefulness and in their selection and application of specific kinds of learning strategies (Alexander, 1995; Butler and Winne, 1995). However, it is unclear what strategies students find the most useful and apply or modify to other contexts based on their purposes for learning. Therefore, this project is investigating what learning strategies students are actively developing, modifying and transferring to new learning contexts based on their learning goals.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress

Combined with

Embedding Writing and Learning Strategies into MGMT 2130 Group Writing
Catharine Lindland (Mount Royal University)

Students often enter university with a limited understanding about themselves as learners and the different strategies needed to succeed in post-secondary. If we can provide them with some of the essential skills they will need in their academic career in a foundational level course, students will presumably be better equipped to cope with similar and possibly more demanding assignments as they progress through their program. From the research on teaching study and writing skills, they are best learned when they are embedded into course content. The most effective delivery for learning study skills is one in which strategies are concurrently modeled, practiced, and applied to meaningful content in subject-specific contexts (Pressley, 2000; Ruban & Reis, 2006; Schunk & Ertmer, 2000; Wade, Trathen, & Schraw, 1990).In Fall 2011, four Writing and Learning Strategists (WLS) are collaborating with all the instructors (7) who teach MGMT 2130 (all 12 sections) to embed writing and learning strategies into a group writing assignment. The WLS’s will be providing four sessions spaced throughout the semester to the students in this course. This is the first time that Student Learning Services has done an intervention on this scale, and we will be analyzing the potential impact of this initiative.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Cedar Room
Exploring the Influence of Course-Based Community Service Learning upon the Development of Professional Identity in Student Teachers at the University of Regina 2011-2014
Heather Ryan (University of Regina)

This presentation examines an ongoing longitudinal study that evaluates the impacts of formalized community service learning experience of students in local agencies. Pre and post evaluations through the use of survey and interview tools with volunteers from the core courses of ECS 200 and ECS 400 will gather student, agency and faculty perspectives of the implications of community learning experience. Discussion will include involvement and role of faculty and local agencies and the role of technology in facilitating and disseminating information. Our students must complete 20 hours of community service as a mandatory component of ECS 200 (Construction of the Learner, the Student and the School) which is intended to allow them to observe/employ the theory taught in the course in the local agency they chose to volunteer in. Last term our students were serving in about 70 agencies,volunteering in a variety of roles. Students become engaged in the community as part of local action. They describe benefits from this experience as: - enhanced cross-cultural understandings and an increased appreciation for diversity - developing awareness of the lives of their future students - increased understanding of community issues influencing children’s lives - understanding of the impact that can be made in a community by sharing skills and talents Both the Faculty of Education and the University benefit by realizing aspects of our mission statements and through engaging with a new demographic. We provide outreach and inter-professional collaboration with community partners, which allows some agencies to grow new and larger programs.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Maple Room
Inside the Envelopes: How Students in a First Year Course See Themselves Changing as Learners
Lee Wertzler (Mount Royal University)

This study arose from questioning how to better facilitate students to work consistently on their own behalves. To start the process, I decided to analyze how students learn over a semester. Students in one section of a first year credit course, Effective Learning in the Undergraduate Context, completed a 10% assignment (Evidence of Change in Self as a Learner) by initially describing themselves as learners and then recording their changes (for themselves) three times during the course. They were invited to include words and anything else of meaning to them. They placed that evidence in envelopes provided to each of them. Since this was an independent assignment, during the course, I did not examine what they had included in their envelopes. At the end of the semester, 11 students consented to having their assignments read and analyzed once final grades were submitted. Then, six individual think alouds were conducted six to eight weeks into the following semester. In this session, I’ll make the claim that many participants saw important changes in themselves as learners as a result of their experiences during the semester. I’ll provide examples of thoughts, feelings, and behaviours that participants provided to themselves as evidence, artifacts they included, evidence of experimentation, and examples of challenges and triumphs that participants described. I’ll also discuss the value of students’ developing a positive sense of self as learner early in their university experience and discuss how Self-Determination Theory is useful for understanding that development.

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Pine Room
Using Mobile Learning to Enhance Historical Thinking in the High School Social Studies Classroom
Allison Hone (Royal Roads University)

Could technology help students to be better historical thinkers? I believe it can, and in particular, I believe mobile learning holds the greatest promise. Mobile technology is growing exponentially, and it only seems to make sense to incorporate mobile learning into the classroom. The opportunities afforded by mobile learning lend themselves well to the high school classroom. With the prevalence of mobile devices such as smartphones and iPods ever increasing, it is possible to use them inside the classroom in a manner that will engage students. I am currently researching the possibility of using mobile technology to enhance the Social Studies curriculum, especially in the area of historical thinking. It is the ability to collaborate, in combination with the portability of this type of learning that led me to begin research on the possibility of using mobile learning to bring new life to historical thinking in a high school Social Studies classroom. As a tenured and experienced high school Social Studies teacher with the Calgary Board of Education, I am always in pursuit of a way to enrich the Social Studies experience for my students that is both authentic and pegagogically sound. My proposal is to study how mobile learning can be introduced into a high school Social Studies classroom, and I am in the midst of planning to begin data collection in the new year.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Willow Room
Rethinking the Duty to Accommodate Through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
Ewa Wasniewski (NorQuest College)

Alberta Employment and Immigration (AEI), in partnership with, Alberta Advanced Education and Technology (AET) recently changed how funding for students with disabilities was allocated to service providers in each publically funded post secondary institution (AET, 2011). In response to the changes in the funding model, the Center for Excellence in Learning Supports (CELS) at NorQuest College in Alberta, has collaboratively redefined their duty to accommodate, thus refining service delivery. During the 2010-2011 academic year, the CELS department reported supporting over 644 students with diagnosed disabilities. These support services include: note talking, academic strategies, alternate formatting, interpreting, CART reporting, assistive technologies and training, tutoring, advising, academic aids and work experience placement support. By using a scholarly approach, the CELS team identified and adapted Barbara Roberts’ Accommodation Decision Tree model (Roberts, 2006). Roberts used the biopsychological model which combines the medical and social factors though integrating the psychology domain of the student as a bridge between all models (Roberts, 2006). This biopsychological model was use by the CELS team to rethink the process of obtaining accommodations, what are reasonable accommodations and how to prevent undue hardship. As stated by Cooper in 2008, “using biopsychosocial insights in the development of educational provision is likely to lead us closer than we have ever been to a genuinely inclusive education system” (Cooper, 2008, p 471). This presentation will share the work that fosters and supports teaching through use of scholarship and increase collaborative learning.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Lynx Salon
Using Factorial Survey Method to Understand Learning in Professional Programs: Do Values and Judgement Change Through the Educational Process?
Jackie Stokes (College of New Caledonia)

The factorial survey method of research was developed first by Rossi and Nock (1982) to examine social judgments. It is a hybrid technique that is an excellent method for studying people’s perceptions, beliefs, judgments, and decisions that are associated with complex multidimensional phenomena1. The design produces multilevel data that considers individual characteristics of the respondent as well as variables within the unit of analysis, or vignette. Factorial survey method has been used in nurses’ decision-making about nutrition, teachers reporting of child abuse, and professional judgments on parenting. The power of the factorial survey design lies in the ability to examine normative beliefs of a group about a concept, judgment, or a decision, but unlike the real world, the independent variables are virtually uncorrelated in the factorial survey. In a factorial survey, respondents are presented with contrived hypothetical situations, called vignettes, of a constructed world in which specific factors, or stimuli, are built in experimentally, or randomly manipulated, by the researcher. Stokes (2009) used the factorial survey method to investigate child protection decision-making as a component of her doctoral dissertation. She is interested in using this method to examine how education and learning affects values and decision-making, specifically in social work. Students would be asked to respond to vignettes upon entry and exit of a two year diploma, and entry and exit of a BSW degree to examine how 2 or 4 years of education has changed their decision-making.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Friday
10:00-11:00 am

Black Bear Room
Are We in This Together? Exploring Student Learning in Anthropological Ethnographic Methods
Adrienne Burk (Simon Fraser University)

As co-researchers conscious of innovative practices in contemporary Anthropology at noted Canadian, US and European institutions, and responsive to concerns at our own institution to develop pedagogical approaches that introduce even undergraduates to a ‘research culture’, two professors in Anthropology have designed a dual semester study, involving four upper division and graduate classes, to explore instructor, independent researcher, and student perceptions of how these courses present content, opportunities for engagement, and risk, both within and beyond a classroom setting. At the time of the conference, it will be possible to present some in-progress data on all of the courses, and give an overview of the content of these courses (SA 472 Memory and Anthropology; SA 875 Ethno graphic Methodology: Social/Cultural Anthropology; SA 402 The Practice of Anthropology; SA 360 Writing the World) though this will be limited to the subset of data generated by the researchers. The larger focus of the presentation will be on the design of the study, which is taking place as part of a teaching inquiry project funded and sanctioned by the university, and which has developed a complex ethics protocol to protect students’ confidentiality by offering multiple decision points around informed consent and involvement in the study. The presentation is designed to offer this model as a potential template for other researchers, and to suggest aspects to consider in designing disciplinarily-appropriate research protocols in teaching inquiry studies.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis

Back to Program

Plenary Keynote Session
Friday, November 11th from 11:00-11:30 am

Friday
11:00-11:30 am

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Please join us in the plenary space to commemorate Remembrance Day.

According to CBC News … “On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, Canadians are asked to pause in memory of the thousands of men and women who sacrificed their lives in military service. At public gatherings in Ottawa and around the country, Canadians pay tribute with two minutes of silence to the country’s fallen soldiers from the First World War, the Second World War, the Korean War, the Afghanistan conflict and peacekeeping missions. Also known as Veterans Day in the U.S., Remembrance Day was first held throughout the Commonwealth in 1919. It marks the armistice to end the First World War, which came into effect at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11, a year earlier.

Why the poppy? The association between the poppy and war dates back to the Napoleonic wars, when a writer saw a field of poppies growing over the graves of fallen soldiers. During the Battle of Ypres in 1915, Canadian Lt.-Col. John McCrae was inspired to write the poem In Flanders Fields on sighting the poppies growing beside a grave of a close friend who had died in battle. The poem was a great inspiration in adopting the poppy as the Flower of Remembrance in Canada, France, the U.S, Britain and Commonwealth countries. The first poppies were distributed in Canada in 1921. Today the volunteer donations from the distribution of millions of poppies is an important source of revenue for the Royal Canadian Legion that goes toward helping ex-servicemen and women buy food, and obtain shelter and medical attention.

From http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/2008/11/07/f-remembrance-day.html.

Back to Program

Coffee Available
Friday, November 11th from 11:30-12:00 pm
Alpine Meadows Reception Area on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band C
Friday, November 11th from 11:30-12:30 am

Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Aspen Room
Generating the Right Balance Between Support and Challenge in Collaborative Learning Situations: Student Perspectives on the Importance of ‘Feeling Comfortable’ as a First Step
Alison Thomas (Douglas College)
Lin Langley (Douglas College)

Although the opportunity to participate in ‘active and collaborative learning’ is regarded as a key feature of high-impact student learning (Kuh, 2008; NSSE 2005), various studies indicate that this is not always as beneficial for students as it might be (Colbeck, Campbell & Bjorklund, 2000; Hallinan & Smith, 1989). Research by Fassinger (1995a,b) and Hyde & Ruth (2002) suggests that one important reason for this may be that students are reluctant to participate fully if they do not feel ‘safe’ doing so, and this reflects a recurrent interest amongst educators in the concept of the classroom as a ‘safe space’ (e.g. Boostrom, 1998; Holley & Steiner, 2005). However, Barrett (2010) suggests that placing too much emphasis on helping students feel ‘comfortable’ may inhibit their ability to develop critical thinking. Referring to Mezirow’s analysis of transformative learning, she points out that this involves students experiencing not only support, but also a degree of challenge. In this presentation we explore her critique with reference to our recent focus group study in which students discussed their experiences of collaborative learning. While all agreed on the importance of feeling ‘comfortable’ with their peers as a pre-condition for productive group work, some also noted that deeper learning could come from situations involving the potential discomfort of disagreeing with each other. In our analysis we relate their perspectives to Barrett’s critique and conclude by considering the roles played by both faculty and students in generating the right balance between support and challenge in collaborative learning situations.

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Birch Room
The Role of Mobile Devices in Pre-Service Teacher Education Programs
Norm Vaughan (Mount Royal University)
Kimberley Lawrence (Mount Royal University)

The purpose of this study is to investigate if and how mobile devices can be used to support student learning in a pre-service teacher education course. The rationale for this study is that students increasingly own their own mobile devices but there is not an abundance of research about how they can use such devices to support their learning in pre-service teacher education programs. This study is taking place during the fall 2011 semester and is focusing on Mount Royal University students and faculty members. Students in the EDUC2325.001: Understanding Current and Emerging Pedagogical Technologies course are each receiving a Mount Royal University Dell ViewSonic Tablet for the fall 2011 semester. They are being invited to complete confidential pre- and post-study online surveys in order to determine changes in their perceptions about how mobile devices can be used to support learning in a pre-service teacher education program over the course of the fall 2011 semester. In addition, all faculty members in Department of Education & Schooling (potential n of 6) are being invited to participate in a thirty minute interview regarding their perceptions about how mobile devices can be used to support learning in a pre-service teacher education program. The study results will hopefully be presented at the Western Canadian Association for Student Teachers (WestCAST) Conference in February 2012 and at the Canadian Society for Studies in Education (CSSE) in May 2012.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Cedar Room
Team-Based Learning: Does It Have a Positive Impact on Student Learning in Accounting?
Valerie Kinnear (Mount Royal University)

Maximizing student engagement and learning is a common concern for many faculty regardless of our discipline. Motivated to try something different, in 2010/11 two accounting faculty members at Mount Royal University redesigned one of their courses and chose “team-based learning” as their teaching strategy based on Michaelson’s (2002 & 2008) and Fink’s (2003) work. The course, "Financial Accounting Practices", is the first course taken by accounting majors after an introduction to financial accounting course required of all business majors. Normally taken in the second year of the Bachelor of Business Administration, the course is a bridge to intermediate financial accounting. But have we been effective in achieving our goals? Is a “team-based learning” teaching strategy more effective than an individual approach to learning financial accounting? An informal evaluation, after our first year of using team-based learning, revealed that students’ grades have improved, thus indicating that further analysis of the pedagogy might provide interesting results. In this, in process, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) research project, I will be analyzing three data sources to more systematically look for correlations between this team approach and learning. The study will use a mixed methodological approach including both qualitative and quantitative methods. Two sources of the data, student term work (team history snap-shots and peer evaluations) and a post-semester, open question, on-line survey, will be analyzed using textual analysis to identify themes and patterns. These results will be compared with student grades in order to triangulate the findings.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Maple Room
How Internationally Educated Health Professionals Value Role Play Simulations in Enriching Their Communication Skills and Knowledge
Deb Bennett (Mount Royal University)
Karen Dodge (Mount Royal University)

This session will present the initial findings from our scholarship of teaching and learning inquiry at Mount Royal University in the Languages Institute. This inquiry explored how internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs) value role play simulations in enriching their communication skills and knowledge. Students from over 15 countries enrolled in this professional communication course have shared their perspectives and transformative learning experiences. The Professional Communication Course for Internationally Educated Health Professionals (PC-IEHP) has a performance based model embedded within the curriculum, allowing for a variety of role plays in class and unrehearsed cases with simulation patients based on relevant healthcare situations. According to Watt, Crutcher and Lake (2006), this method encourages the internalization of language as behavior. Students received individual, structured feedback on their performance and structured advice for how to improve their communication interactions. Watt et al.(2006) maintain that feedback from a variety of sources including instructors, patients and peers, combined with self reflecion is required to improve communication. The uniqueness of the PC-IEHP course called for an inquiry where students could describe their learning and development. Student voices describing how role play simulations are valued and how they enrich learning will be shared. The impact of this learning tool on communication confidence as well as how skills become integrated into various contexts will be presented. Filmed student role play simulations will be viewed, adding further insight into the student learning process. The researchers’ experiences, challenges and transformative moments during the inquiry process will also be described.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Pine Room
The Role of the Arts in Hosting a “Collegial Conversation” on the Heart of Higher Education
Kim West (University of Saskatchewan)

The Heart of Higher Education: A Call to Renewal by Palmer and Zajonc (2010) is a compelling call for action that focuses on the role of collegial conversations in creating a culture of integrative education and trust in academia. Inspired by the message of the book, a campus-wide community art exhibit was hosted at the University of Saskatchewan as a venue to bring students and educators together, discuss the inner sanctum of teacher’s lives, and to explore art as a pedagogical method for critical reflection and inquiry. This presentation will focus on the role that the arts can play in institutional/program support and development, particularly in creating a space for students and educators to engage in collegial conversations (Palmer and Zajonc 2010). Although our exhibit was centred on the heart of higher education, we will discuss how individuals or groups could organize similarly themed community art exhibits to bring together diverse groups of people and to create welcoming, inclusive, and shared institutional spaces for conversation and connection. I will conclude the presentation by discussing a variety of activities that we used to evoke critical reflection and ongoing dialogue amongst contributors and participants, on a local and national level, before, during, and after the art exhibit.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Willow Room
The Role of Institutional Leadership in Cultivating a Culture of Flexible Teaching and Learning at Nipissing University: Honey, Vinegar, and a Dash of Tenacity
Lorraine Carter (Nipissing University)

The history of education at Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario is impressive. For more than 100 years, persons wanting to become elementary and secondary teachers have completed their preparation at the North Bay Normal School, the North Bay Teacher’s College, and now Nipissing University’s Schulich School of Education. Additionally, with its small classes, Nipissing is well recognized as an educational community committed to the success of every student. This notion is captured in Nipissing’s promise of success for “one student at a time.” Given this history, one might expect that a recent decision to create a teaching and learning centre grounded in principles of flexibility (Kahn, 2007) and access (Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario, 2011) would be a reasonably straightforward initiative. While change management issues were anticipated, the angst for some community members was both palpable and deep (Rogers, 2003). Fear about new ways of thinking about teaching on instructors’ daily practices was significant. Equally suspect were online and other forms of technology-supported education as possible replacements for more traditional learning settings. Ironically, much of the literature suggests that university instructors express a need for teaching supports of all varieties (Carter & Brockerhoff-Macdonald, in press). In this session, the Academic Director of Nipissing’s Centre for Flexible Teaching and Learning will reflect on the role of leadership in the Centre’s development and identity. Particular attention will be provided to personal, professional, and other factors affecting the evolution of the Centre.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Lynx Salon
Using Grounded Theory to Discover What Fosters the Development of Student Writers’ Expertise in the Major
Mary Goldschmidt (The College of New Jersey)

My study is part of the Elon University Research Seminar on “Critical Transitions: Writing and Question of Transfer,” a two-year, campus-based and multi-institutional research project addressing the premise that writing can be taught, and that writing knowledge can be “transferred” across various thresholds in and beyond higher education. Specifically, I will be tracking students’ emergence into the discourse communities of Computer Science and Psychology by looking at two key points in the curriculum: the mid- and senior-level writing intensive courses. I contend that how students “see” and master the genres of their major will be central to an understanding of how they transfer learning from their early to more advanced courses in their major. While genres do involve specific writing standards, including specialized vocabularies, formats, and other technical norms, they are, more importantly, ways to communicate and problem solve in a specific discourse community. I am, therefore, interested in how students understand their development of writerly agency. This presentation will explore how the emergent techniques of grounded theory’s qualitative interviewing process can be especially useful for understanding how students perceive and conceptualize their movement into expertise. My method also involves text-based interviews that will engage students in reflection about their papers from the writing intensive courses. The recursive process of coding and memo writing will facilitate pedagogically useful analytical categories for understanding the learning conditions, methods, and processes that helped student writers acquire writerly expertise, and thereby assist faculty in the design of their courses and majors.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Friday
11:30-12:30 am

Black Bear Room
Pop Goes the Textbook: Reflections on the role of pop culture topics (like hockey) and forms (like the comic book) in university curricula
Paul Martin (Grant MacEwan University)
Richard Harrison (Mount Royal University)

In Richard Harrison’s course “Comics as Literature” and Paul Martin’s “Hero of the Play: Hockey in Canadian Literature,” students frequently identify themselves as reluctant readers of what they perceive as High Literature. They often admit that they have selected these courses because they see the required reading as much more pleasurable than that found elsewhere in the curriculum. What students do not anticipate is that in these courses we examine many of the same questions, and teach virtually all of the same skills, as we do in any other literature course. As, so far, our experience seems to demonstrate, by the end of each course, students see significant changes to their earlier assumptions about their own skills and preferences as readers. But do students in such courses learn anything that can help them better read, understand and enjoy the forms of literature they used to see as distant and less pleasurable? Do the skills transfer? Certainly at least some scholars defend such courses on that basis. Or is this asking the wrong questions of such courses? Do we need to “justify” courses in pop culturally relevant forms and subjects by the way they relate to courses in “higher” art forms when we do not ask the same questions of courses in acknowledged “equal forms” of poetry and fiction? We propose these questions as part of our collaborative investigation into the study of literature in a culture which divides both that literature and itself into “high” and “low.”

Category: Calls for collaboration, triangulation, and development

Back to Program

Buffet Lunch
Friday, November 11th from 12:30-2:00 pm
Castle/Assiniboine Rooms on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band D
Friday, November 11th from 2:30-3:30 pm

Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Aspen Room
Exploring Fourth Year Nursing Students’ description of transition to professional practice
Joanna Szabo (Mount Royal University)

Recruitment and retention issues continue to be a prevalent issue in nursing in all domains of practice. An “at risk” population that needs more substantive research and attention is student nurses. In this presentation the findings from an exploratory study about the meaning of transition for fourth year nursing students will be described. Data was collected from twenty two field note journals and seven face-face interviews. The findings support the claim that becoming-nursing students share narratives that bring to light their perceived gap between theory and practice. For the participants of this study the meaning of the experience of transitioning to practice manifested developing a personal vision of leadership, longing to belong in the midst of feeling alien, the awareness of becoming professional, and struggling with uncertainty. In this presentation I will also discuss the parameters and evolution of the study as a means of engaging you where you are in your classroom inquiry.

Additional Documentation - Narratives of transition: Opening Dialogues into the Complexity of Nursing Education (Handout) - Joanna Szabo

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Birch Room
Critical Reading and Social Engagement in General Education
Karen Manarin (Mount Royal University)
Miriam Carey (Mount Royal University)
Glen Ryland (Mount Royal University)

Reading is a foundational skill for success in the academy, in professional endeavors and in democratic society. The term “critical reading” has two distinct traditions: reading for academic purposes and reading for social or civic engagement. Both definitions address key features of the LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes and support the goals of general education, articulated at Mount Royal University as a mandate to develop “important intellectual and civic capacities” in students. This session describes the evidence-based assessment practices used to gather information about how students demonstrate critical reading across the four areas of Mount Royal’s first-year general education program. Four instructors from different disciplines shared the same research question: How do students demonstrate critical reading, defined as reading for academic purposes and reading for social engagement? We also shared the same research protocol, data gathering methods and methodology for analysing the data. Researchers examined the written work produced by students in four foundational general education courses looking for indicators of critical reading, levels of accomplishment, and change over time. This investigation also included post-course semi-structured interviews with students willing to talk about their readings of the course texts and their perceptions of critical reading. The data were analyzed using hybridized versions of the AAC&U VALUE rubrics for reading, information literacy, integrative learning and civic engagement. The session presents early results of this study, with particular attention on how students demonstrate, or fail to demonstrate, civic or social engagement in their reading.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Cedar Room
Balancing Active Learning Methods and Lecturing: Aiming Towards Effectiveness in Practice
Debashrita Ghosh Dastidar (Osaka University)
Tomoko Arikawa (Osaka University)

This presentation focuses on re-thinking classroom practices in terms of student learning outcomes. The context of the course to be discussed is offered in Humanities. The need to re-think classroom practices originates from the authors’ own experience of attending lectures as a foreign student and later on offering similar courses to foreign students as an instructor. Large amounts of guidance may produce very good performance during practice, but too much guidance may impair later performance (1992, cited in Bernstein, Penner, Clarke-Stewart, Roy, & Wickens, 2003). Even though lecturing is an integral part of instructional strategies in Humanities, it is equally crucial to create learning environments which foster active participation of the learners individually as well as in collaborative groups. Students must do more than just listen. Bonwell & Eison(1991). Therefore, this instructional model presents a blend of traditional and active learning strategies. It consists of the various teaching methods used in the classroom, which actively engage students and encourage them in taking responsibility of their own learning. In order to examine the reliability of the model to construct new knowledge effectively and achieve the learning outcomes of the course, we will discuss each teaching method and the various aspects related to implementing them in the classroom. Also, validate it along with the results of qualitative evidence from observation and student evaluations supporting the active learning techniques implemented in this course. We would like to share our results and receive feedback to further enhance active learning to the best of our ability.

Category: Calls for collaboration, triangulation, and development
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Maple Room
Exploring the Use of Signature Pedagogies at Red River College
Christina Rogoza (Red River College)
Katharine Langille (Red River College)
Jeanine Wall (Red River College)

Presenters will discuss the preliminary findings of a study on the exploration of the use of signature pedagogies at Red River College. Twenty-three instructors and five co-researchers participated in focus groups from the following programs: Engineering Technologist, Accounting, Computer Programming, and Early Childhood Education. Shulman (2005) defined signature pedagogies as “the types of teaching that organize the fundamental ways in which future practitioners are educated for their new professions.” (p. 52). It is evident that in programs such as Nursing, emphasis is placed upon educating students to ‘think and act like a nurse’. Should we expect a similar teaching approach in other disciplines at Red River College? For example, does the construction management technologist have a particular way of thinking? What does it mean for an electrician to behave in an ethical manner? Preliminary findings indicate the presence of a signature pedagogy for the Early Childhood Education Program. For Accounting, Computer Programming and Engineering it was difficult to distinguish between what might be a disciplinary specific approach and a generic approach to teaching at the college level. In the focus groups there was consensus that the college environment typically afforded greater interactivity between instructor and student than at a university. For example, at the college, lecture style is minimal as students are actively engaged in hands-on activities. Consequently, instructional approaches in the different disciplines may resemble signature pedagogies due to the emphasis on applied learning. Further exploration will focus on consistency of approaches in the disciplines.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Pine Room
The Value of Experience: Critical Thinking in the Multidisciplinary Classroom
Heather Nelson (Mount Royal University)

Critical thinking skills are developed over a long period of time and start before we as university educators ever see these students in our classrooms. But what are students actually bringing to the table? To what degree have their critical thinking skills been developed and how are they being used? What role does a student’s personal experience play in how they use their critical thinking skills? In examining one section of a first year general education course, I discovered that students who used personal experiences were more successful in their efforts to engage with the course material, were better able to demonstrate an understanding of theories or concepts and were effective at supporting the claims they were making. Students who attempted to reproduce academic jargon and engage in complex theorizing or made generalizations tended to be less successful in their attempts to engage with the material in this first year class.

Category: Completed teaching and learning research
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Willow Room
Website Credibility Evaluation: What Criteria Do Students Draw on When Evaluating Websites?
Patrick Carmichael (Mount Royal University)

The greatest challenge facing first-year university students is not access to information, but rather the deluge of information they have at their fingertips through the Internet: however, few are equipped to evaluate the validity and biases of website information. This research examines how students learn to evaluate websites. The study is currently underway with two General Education classes totalling 64 students. A baseline of student skills and perceptions has been established with a written reflection on website evaluation (100 word paragraph), followed by a critique of four websites. Students next participate in a workshop on objective ways to evaluate website credibility, after which they re-evaluate the four websites previously critiqued. Later, they compare both of their website critiques and write a paragraph on what changed and why. In addition to other bibliographic requirements for the term paper, students include two non-academic websites, and critique these selections. Another written reflection on assessing website credibility will be gathered after the term paper is submitted. These data are examined for changes in perception and performance, and mitigating factors are taken into account (e.g. prior training, poor class attendance). The goal is to understand: a) student perceptions of the website evaluation process b) how students acquire and apply evaluative skills c) barriers and facilitators affecting outcomes.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Friday
2:30-3:30 pm

Black Bear Room
Asking the Right Questions: Creating Connections through Pan University Consultation on a Framework for Teaching and Learning
Albert Johnson (Memorial University)
Maureen Dunne (Memorial University)
Joyce Fewer (Memorial University)

In May 2011, the Senate of Memorial University unanimously ratified an institutional framework for teaching and learning. The precursor of this significant moment in the university’s history was an intense three months of pan university consultation. The processes applied in the consultation were congruent with the principles of adult learning and appreciative inquiry grounded in personal experience and focused on positive learning outcomes. Asking the right questions in the consultative process connected the community in a powerful, shared conversation about positive learning experiences and created momentum towards the development of a robust framework that will guide future initiatives in teaching and learning at Memorial. The high level of engagement and enthusiasm indicated that the university community was ready for a conversation about teaching and learning. In this session, the presenters will invite participants to experience a mini version of the structure of the consultation sessions, share their analysis and insight on why the process was successful, and consider how Memorial’s experience could be replicated elsewhere.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development

Back to Program

Coffee Available
Friday, November 11th from 3:30-4:00 pm
Alpine Meadows Reception Area on the Mezzanine Level

Plenary Keynote Session
Friday, November 11th from 4:00-5:30 pm

Friday
4:00-5:30 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Why the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning is a Dangerous Idea
Stephen Chew (Samford University)

Why are some teachers and universities so resistant, even fearful, of scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL)? It isn’t the usual teaching fad that can be embraced as evidence of good teaching only to be abandoned for the next big thing. SoTL demands evidence of student learning, and poses the danger of revealing that learning and the teaching that supports it is much more intricate than many faculty and administrators would like to believe. It means that teaching is a complex skill that takes years of effort to develop, and that learning is not always the obvious outcome (sometimes revealing that faculty are not as effective as they might like to believe). It can undermine cherished beliefs, such as “Domain knowledge is the key to good teaching and effective learning” and “Being good at research makes one a more effective teacher.” SoTL has the ability to make teaching and learning better, but at the cost of simple, convenient, and comforting notions about both. I will discuss some examples from SoTL research demonstrating there are factors that affect teaching and learning effectiveness which most teachers (and many learners) either misunderstand or completely fail to consider.

Additional Documentation - Improving Classroom Performance by Challenging Student Misconceptions About Learning - Stephen Chew.

This keynote has been generously sponsored by Mount Royal University’s Faculty of Teaching and Learning.

Back to Program

Dinner on your Own
Friday, November 11th from 5:30-7:00 pm

Scholars Reception
Friday, November 11th from 7:00-8:00 pm

Friday
7:00-8:00 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Please join us in celebrating the Mount Royal University Teaching and Learning Scholars, including the newly selected 2012 Teaching and Learning Scholars. Wine, beer, and soft drinks will be provided by the Teaching and Learning Scholars Program.

Symposium Dance
Friday, November 11th from 8:00-12:00 m

Friday
8:00-12:00 m

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
As has become the tradition at our Symposium, this evening will feature music and dancing until midnight. This year our music will be provided by Class Act.

Breakfast Buffet
Saturday, November 12th from 7:00-10:00 am
Chinook Buffet on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band E
Saturday, November 12th from 8:30-9:30 am

Saturday
8:30-9:30 pm

Birch Room
Writing the Course: Students as Consultants in Assignment Development and Redesign
Lee Wertzler (Mount Royal University)

Offering a course for the first time provides both challenge and opportunity. For the first offering of UGST 1002 (Coping with Change: The Undergraduate Context and Beyond) I developed a final application paper that involved primarily applying ideas from a framework for coping by analyzing how one individual coped or currently is coping with change and stress. Early in the term, I asked for student input as to how they thought the proposed assignment would work. Also, there were many choices built into the assignment. My research question was “What do students report that they experience and learn from writing an application paper on coping with change?” Participant application papers were analyzed once final grades were submitted and three small focus groups were conducted the following semester. Hear what the students said and wrote about what they learned, how some new experiences they had in relation to choice and structure impacted their learning, their suggestions for what is worthwhile in a final application paper, and how they felt about being consulted about the assignment. Also, I’ll share some surprises I had in terms of the assignment, discuss the potential of explicit efforts to balance choice and structure in assignment design, and indicate how such efforts would be compatible with the central beliefs of Self-Determination Theory.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
8:30-9:30 pm

Cedar Room
Validating Teaching Quality Standards at a Canadian Community College
Margaret Wilson (NorQuest College)
Bruce Faunt (NorQuest College)
Dinne Ockerman (NorQuest College)
Patti Lefevre (NorQuest College)

The goal of this research study is to validate 44 teaching quality standards that apply to a transformational definition of teaching excellence that has been adopted at a Canadian Community College. These quality standards build upon the research of the NorQuest Task Force on Teaching Excellence (Sept 2010) and consider the complexity of teaching at the post-secondary level. A participatory action research design was chosen to guide the validation process over a twenty month period from October 2010 to June 2012. The mixed methods approach to data collection includes surveys, focus groups, and interviews. Two cycles of data collection characterize the research with faculty, continuing education instructors, and administrators invited to participate in the both cycles. Two formal ethics applications were submitted to the NorQuest College Ethics Board to allow for the validated quality standards to become public knowledge. Data from the first cycle of research has been analyzed and the quality standards have been djusted accordingly. The second cycle of data collection is underway. Volunteer faculty have been developed as researchers and will join the existing research team to validate the revised standards. This session explores the rational for choosing a participatory action research design and encourages feedback on the processes planned for the second cycle of data collection.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
8:30-9:30 pm

Maple Room
Measuring and Monitoring Institutional Academic Performance
Ernest C. Linsay (Wilmington University)

How can an institution measure its academic performance and assess progress towards its goals for student learning? How can an institution uncover areas of weakness and monitor corrective actions that are implemented? Wilmington University located in Delaware uses several approaches to address these questions. One approach is the use of The IDEA Center’s instrument for student rating of instruction. Besides using the results to help improve individual instruction (and thereby learning), Wilmington University utilizes IDEA Group and Institutional data as one means to define, measure and monitor performance of programs, individual Colleges and the entire Institution. In new analyses, drilling down into IDEA data allows separation of Face-to-Face and Distance Learning results so that these two teaching formats can now be evaluated individually and also compared to each other. If analyses of the data disclose areas of weakness, action plans for improvement are developed, implemented and then monitored to “close the loop.” Findings and interpretations from IDEA results will be described as well as institutional changes that were implemented when appropriate.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Saturday
8:30-9:30 pm

Lynx Salon
Dual Perspectives and the Significance of Trust in the University
Kim West (University of Saskatchewan)

A sense of belonging and trust is one of the most significant aspects in college and university culture and in retaining students in higher education. In this presentation we will explore dual perspectives of trust from the point of view of a graduate student who is, at the same time, an educator. Using an innovative methodology termed poetic transcription (Glesne 2005; 1997) we will compare the unique experiences of this graduate student teacher with the results shared at the 2010 Centennial Symposium that compiled the perspectives of trust from experienced award-winning teachers from several research-focused mid-sized Western universities. In this presentation we will describe the strengths of using poetic transcription to express the lived experiences of students and teachers, particularly as a way to capture sentiment and emotion on topics like trust which can be elusive and challenging to quantify. We will also discuss the potential of using poetry in shared spaces as a way to engage students and teachers in ongoing reflection, dialogue, and inquiry around issues of trust within the university.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Saturday
8:30-9:30 pm

Black Bear Room
Meaningful E-Learning (MEL): An International Multi-Institution Research Project
Vincent Salyers (Mount Royal University)
Lorraine Carter (Nipissing University)
Penelope Barrett (Charles Sturt University)
Tina Benevides (Nipissing University)
Jessica Biles (Charles Sturt University)
Joanne Kmiec (Nipissing University, Muskoka Campus)
Christa MacLean (Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science & Technology)
Maureen Mitchell (Mount Royal University)
Gavin Park (Nipissing University)
Stephen Tedesco (Nipissing University, Branford Campus)

Most universities now utilize educational technologies and e-learning strategies to deliver substantive components of curricula and programs. As part of the e-learning trend, many academic staff/faculty are being strongly encouraged to use different strategies to ensure consistency in course delivery and, in some instances, reduce face-to-face (f2f) contact hours for students (Carter, Rukholm, & Kelloway, 2009; Carter, 2008). While the benefits related to access and flexibility are self-evident when courses are delivered using these strategies, various challenges also emerge. These challenges include, but are not limited to: geographic and technological barriers, lack of instructional design support, inconsistent, inadequate or unreliable infrastructure support, as well as varying degrees of faculty and student experience with e-learning environments ( Donato, Hudyma, & Carter, 2010; Salyers, 2007; Barrett, & Salyers, 2010; Salyers, Carter, Barrett, & Williams, 2010 a, b). This presentation will discuss the development of a collaborative research project between 4 post-secondary/tertiary institutions in Australia and Canada resulting from a call for collaboration, triangulation and scholarship development at the Centennial Symposium in 2010. The Meaningful E-Learning (MEL) research project will specifically explore the following variables: a) student and faculty perceptions of quality e-learning courses, b) challenges associated with e-learning courses, c) prerequisite knowledge and e-learning skills, d) learning styles and e-learning, e) characteristics of quality e-learning courses. Guiding principles established by the team to inform research processes will be presented. Participants will also be invited to share their ideas about this “in progress” research collaboration and the proposed methodology for the study.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis

Back to Program

Coffee Available
Saturday, November 12th from 9:30-10:00 am
Chinook Buffet on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band F
Saturday, November 12th from 10:00-11:00 am

Saturday
10:00-11:00 am

Cedar Room
ESL 5 Meets College Composition through A ‘Sink or Swim’ Approach: A Chronicle of Student Learning in LC101--An Integrative Learning Community
Ismet Ozkilic (Holyoke Community College)

LC 101 is a 9-credit LC that combines ESL 5 with ENG 101. At the very conceptual level, it presents many complexities for the students (each cohort being a diverse group of different ethnicities, languages, ages, etc.) as well as the co-teaching faculty pair. After all, taking a group of students from the completion of Level 4 ESL Reading & Writing, and teaching them College Composition with the same learning outcomes expected from a stand-alone ENG 101 is not exactly an established pedagogy. This LC recognizes outright the infeasibility of trying to solve persistent ELL issues in a single semester. Instead, LC 101 teaches students the skills and gives them the tools necessary to surround themselves with professional help through campus resources while doing their authentic essay-type writing through a scaffolded process. From Robert Kaplan’s “contrastive rhetoric” (1966) to Joy Reid’s “eye” learners and “ear” learners concept (1998) and to Vivian Zamel and Ruth Spack’s “multilingual learners in college classrooms” (2004), hundreds of probing studies have attempted to understand the dynamics of how learning happens in an L2 setting. Given the novelty that this LC still is, instead of a highly theoretical approach, the framework of exploration in this study is through student surveys, testimonies, and case studies in an attempt to document some key elements of student success. Quantitative data gathered on student completion rates and student success beyond the LC show clearly positive results. The missing piece is qualitative data, which is what this study aims to present.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
10:00-11:00 am

Maple Room
Preliminary Findings on Quantifying How Engineering Students Use Webcasts of Class Lectures
Cheryl Schramm (Carleton University)

While online course content is expanding to include video-captured lectures, there is little data available concerning how students use the video-casts for learning nor its effects on attendance, course engagement and success. The paper presents preliminary data gathered during the Summer offering of a first year Engineering course. The study is intended to help assess the use of video-casts as a teaching tool and their potential effectiveness. The data collected in the study included monitoring of students’ access to the lecture recordings that were made available on the course’s Learning Management System, attendance records and two online student surveys. These surveys focused student’s opinion on their use of video recorded lectures, one conducted midway through the course and the other to be conducted this fall after deferred exams are completed. Work is now proceeding on a quantitative analysis of the compiled data as well as the students’ final grades to provide insights into access, especially related to coursework and test schedules. One early finding was the difficulty in obtaining accurate attendance in large classes.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
10:00-11:00 am

Pine Room
A Student’s Résumé is Like a Christmas Tree: Adding Diverse Achievements Towards Better Grant and Job Opportunities
Carmen Ciubotariu (Mount Royal University)

The paper reports the results of a two-year span study through interviews of first year students who discovered that creative involvement to execute grading requirements helps finding new interest and skills. Creative and critical thinking support scholar success, for teachers and students alike. For many years I had the special opportunity to teach a variety of courses to undergraduate junior students that allowed me identify their hidden abilities. Alternately, instructors that have the same student can find the optimal way to motivate and trigger interests so that each learner sees that the study environment is increasingly stimulating and rewarding. It becomes beneficial to both teachers and learners to go beyond the minimal or sufficient assignment work for the A grade into bonus requirements. As creativity finds no boundaries, the student takes the diverse achievements to a higher level of dissemination and/or application of standard course work to summer undergraduate research. The primary aim of this two years study was to determine perceptions of six cohorts of first year students (300 engineering, science and non-science students) on “beyond the marking scheme” project requirements as a critical reflective approach for evolving career interests and their distinction from hobby activities. The multi-perspective and challenging nature of the bonus assignment items was particularly appealing to 60% of the science interviewed students, 90% of the engineering and 30% of the non-science students. The paper also presents outstanding student work that has extrapolated into a variety of grants and awards obtained for extracurricular activities and research.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
10:00-11:00 am

Aspen Room
Beyond Traditional Scientific Paradigms: A “Spiritual” Approach to Research
Nancy Doetzel (Mount Royal Unversity)

My innovative approach to data gathering and analysis, involved conducting on-line interviews, designing a web discussion page, and applying “appreciative inquiry” to the data collection and analysis. Some scholars refer to “appreciative inquiry” as a “spiritual” approach to scholarly research. A hunger for something beyond the traditional scientific paradigms is leading educators to map out new territories of “spiritualizing” education, despite tensions created by misunderstandings of the term “spirituality”. For the purpose of my research, I defined spirituality as a latent inherent truth awakened by contemplation, rituals, peak life experiences and caring acts of kindness; when awakened, spirituality is a sensation of the sacred, a sentiment of hope, a feeling of enthusiasm and excitement, and a heart-felt sense of interconnection with others. My qualitative triangulated research study suggests how a holistic integration of mind and heart within educational leadership and teaching practices could result in educators becoming more effective in fulfilling their true mission. One goal of my research, conducted on-line, was to explore how educational leaders and teachers could integrate “spirituality” into their practices to assist them to become more effective leaders and teachers. An ideal educator of this new millennium is being viewed as an inspirational leader who integrates the intelligence of mind and spirit, and actively leads synergistically from mind and heart. Educators who attend this session will be introduced to an award-winning study that demonstrates an innovative approach to researching “spirituality within education” and shows how “appreciative inquiry” can complement other approaches to data collection/analysis.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Saturday
10:00-11:00 am

Black Bear Room
Rapid IT Assessment Teams: Collaborative Assessment Designed by Teaching Faculty, IT Professionals and the Libraries
Diane E Sieber (University of Colorado Boulder)
Mark Werner (University of Colorado Boulder)

Traditionally, educational technologies on university campuses have either been adopted organically (unsupported by central IT organizations until a critical mass of adoption has been reached), or they have been centrally supported and launched on university campuses with hopes that they would be widely adopted. This presentation articulates a third path--both collaborative and multidisciplinary—which we hope is more scalable across institutions of higher learning. The assessment partnership comprises a faculty member who is an early adopter of technologies and a SoTL practitioner; a Libraries faculty member leveraging technologies to support bridges between teaching and the Libraries; and the campus-level IT administrator/edtech researcher. Multiple survey tools and focus interviews with both students and instructors have revealed unanticipated expectations of and learning affordances of the social network application examined.

Further, as universities attempt to more rapidly adopt emerging teaching and learning technologies, they must learn to form just-in-time partnerships among faculty, IT professionals and educational researchers; design versatile and effective tools for assessing in-process teaching and learning implementations, and become more immediately responsive to new opportunities presented by emergent technology applications. This session provides the following takeaways:
  • How to set up a network that alerts IT organizations to emergent technologies for teaching and learning, particularly in the social media space.
  • Methods to form just-in-time partnerships among faculty, IT professionals and educational researchers and to support their research design and IRB submissions.
  • How to balance a new culture of rapid response to emergent technologies with a methodologically sound research scaffolding.
  • Preliminary learning outcomes within these same educational contexts, as well as effective dissemination practices that push outcomes information to campus instructors.
  • A summary of the research project findings so far, including demonstrated impacts and affordances of innovation social media applications for teaching practices and for student learning.
Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis

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Coffee Available
Saturday, November 12th from 11:00-11:30 am
Alpine Meadows Reception Area on the Mezzanine Level

Concurrent Sessions - Band G
Saturday, November 12th from 11:30-12:30 pm

Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Aspen Room
Spatial Cognition: The Voyage From Novice Student to Professional Across Multiple Disciplines
Katharine Boggs (Mount Royal University)
Robin Thompson (Mount Royal University)
Robyn Ayles (Mount Royal University)
David Bird (Mount Royal University)
Carol Jefferies (Mount Royal University)
Clare Mackey (Mount Royal University)

Spatial ability was defined by Elliot and Smith (1983) as the mental reconstruction and manipulation of visual forms and the perception and retention of visual shapes. High-level spatial cognitive skills are critical for novice students to acquire during their journey towards becoming professionals in multiple disciplines such as the geosciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, interior design and theatre (Ishikawa and Kastens, 2005; Kastens and Ishikawa, 2006; Kastens, 2009; Lee et al, 2009; NRC 2006). We will discuss various approaches being used to assist students in acquiring spatial cognitive skills. Ayles uses an interactive website to guide theatre students towards developing the 3D visualization skills for stage design. Thompson has developed Google Earth models to assist geology students in visualizing what 2D figures represent in 3D. Bird uses a model to demonstrate the 3D visualization skills are essential for cellular microscopy.. Jefferies has engineering students use isometric grid coordinates to represent 3D force vectors on a 2D paper. Boggs will also present the results from her SoTL study on how students learn to use a stereonet to represent 3D geological structures on 2D pieces of paper. This presentation will conclude with a discussion of how spatial cognitive skills are taught in other disciplines and/or at other institutes. The intent here is to encourage collaboration on teaching these challenging skills to the novice student during their voyage towards becoming professionals.

Category: Calls for collaboration, triangulation, and development
Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Birch Room
Investigation of Nursing Students’ Perceptions of Learning Outcomes in Using Nursing Student Dyads to Foster Collaborative Learning
Mohamed El Hussein (Mount Royal University)

To bridge the theory-practice gap, innovative models of clinical education are required to enhance the development of meaning making for students and the real life application of classroom learning to the clinical education setting. Active Engagement Model is a form of peer learning that utilizes clinical instruction that provides an environment which facilitates and incorporates a collaborative approach and understanding on the part of students in application to the real life clinical education setting. In this model, nursing students are paired in complementary dyads collectively managing an assigned patient load. Learning outcomes are mutually obtained by both students in the dyad with a commitment to a mutual sharing of responsibility for the outcomes of nursing practice with an assigned client load. In this research project, the student perspective on the meaning of dyad learning and how it contributes to their development as clinical practitioners is explored. The plan is to assign a dyad each week to care for one patient and arrange for the students in dyads to be interviewed after the end of the course. Guiding questions for interviews will be developed based on the major concepts of collaborative learning. A usual part of the student assignment is the reflective journal. Students will be instructed as part of this investigation to consider on a weekly basis their reflections on their dyad experience. Coding and categorizing of interview transcripts and reflective journals will be done to determine emerging themes to inform clinical instructors about the impact of dyads on students’learning.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Cedar Room
The Usefulness of Creative Problem Solving to Mid-Career Professional MBA Students
Amy Zidulka (Royal Roads University)

Creativity skills are increasingly considered a necessary core competency for workplace success and a necessary part of the MBA curriculum. But what faculty can do to help foster these skills is far from clear, and few generally agreed on pedagogical strategies exist. This SOTL project aims to contribute to the conversation on how to design curriculum that fosters creativity by exploring the perceived usefulness of the Creative Problem Solving (CPS) process to mid- career MBA learners. It is particularly interested in what aspects of CPS students would foresee bringing into their workplace, and how in doing practicum work, they adapt concepts taught in class to the complexity of a professional context. The research takes place within the context of an elective course, Leading Innovation, taught via distance learning. Students are asked to use CPS in teams of three in addressing a “live case,” a challenge presented to them by an organizational leader. Students are then asked to arrange a practicum in which they will guide two or more participants in addressing a professional challenge that requires a creative response. Most students are employed so can arrange the practicum within their own workplaces. Data will be collected through examination of student logs, which they keep as they move through the steps of CPS; two reflective papers; the students’ session plan, in which they outline which tools and exercises they will use for their practicum; and the students’ online discussion-board posts, where they share reflections and insights with their classmates.

Category: Early returns and initial findings of work in progress
Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Willow Room
Student Retention and Institutional Support for A First-Year Outdoor Orientation Program: Early Results from the ‘Brock BaseCamp’ Experience
Anna Lathrop (Brock University)

Although outdoor orientation programs, designed to enhance student retention, are relatively commonplace in colleges and universities in the United States (Barefoot & Koch, 2011; Bell, Holmes, & Williams, 2010), to our knowledge, no Canadian university has adopted a campus-wide, first-year outdoor-based student transition initiative. Outdoor orientation experiences are believed to provide advantages to students through improved academic performance, campus integration, self-efficacy and life effectiveness (Frauman & Waryold, 2009; Jones & Hinton, 2007; Oldmixon, 2007; Tobolowsky, Cox & Wagner, 2005). This study reports on the preliminary findings of a first-year outdoor orientation program (“Brock BaseCamp”) held at Brock University--a medium-sized University located atop the Niagara Escarpment in Ontario, Canada. In the summer of 2010 and 2011, several groups of first-year students were taken on either a five-day canoe or backpacking trip, or a three-day rock climbing experience. In addition to technical skills, student facilitators presented a curriculum that focused on the “ins-and-outs” of student life including topics such as time management, study skills, and the importance of work/school/life balance. Both the 2010 and 2011student cohorts were administered a pre-test and two post-tests that measured “life effectiveness” (using the Life Effectiveness Questionnaire, Neill, Marsh & Richards, 2003). The 2010 cohort was also interviewed in a focus group format with regard to their perceptions about their subsequent integration into academic life. This paper discusses the preliminary results of this research, and reports on the institutional impact of this retention initiative via student engagement incentives, curriculum development and strategic student recruitment.

Category: Institutional/Program support and development
Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Lynx Salon
Use of Grouped Self-Assessments in Health Professions Program Evaluation
Marcel F D’Eon (University of Saskatchewan)
Krista Trinder (University of Saskatchewan)
Angela Busch (University of Saskatchewan)
Brenda Dean (University of Saskatchewan)
Cathy Arnold (University of Saskatchewan)
Peggy Proctor (University of Saskatchewan)

Both the College of Medicine (COM) and the School of Physical Therapy (SPT) use grouped student self-assessments to measure program efficacy. The COM polls their medical students at the mid-point just before beginning hospital rotations (clerkship) and just prior to graduation. In addition they have asked the students to estimate the extent to which they had reached the objective on the first day of medical school. This gives both a needs assessment AND a progress or learning slope for each part of the four year program. One year post graduation the SPT asks their graduates to rate themselves and asks their supervisors/employers to rate the graduates on entry level competencies. There is good agreement between grouped graduate self-assessments and employer ratings. This method of gathering data has two very important and powerful advantages for decision makers. First, it provides a rare glimpse of the strength of the entire program, not just courses and isolated activities, with not just processes but actual outcomes. Second, it is relatively simple and inexpensive to conduct. The only weakness is that self-assessments may be inaccurate though previous research shows that grouped self-assessments are good proxy measures of more objective data. This session will consist of a short presentation of COM and SPT data followed by a discussion of the implementation and application of these methods to one’s own institution.

Category: Innovative approaches to data gathering and analysis
Saturday
11:30-12:30 pm

Black Bear Room
Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL) Collaborative
Gary Hunt (Thompson Rivers University)
Heather Hurren (University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus)

Three campuses have received joint research funding from the Educational Developers Caucus to create a website for SoTL collaboration.Visitors to the site will be able to access a variety of levels of engagement into the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, including reviewing current projects, searching for collaborators in their area of interest and disseminating their research results. The portal will allow visitors to search the database for potential collaborators, access ideas and projects that are currently underway or planned, and link to summaries of completed SoTL projects. The possibility of cross-institutional research will be enhanced with the use of this electronic tool. Our goal is to create a vital connection between academic institutions that will introduce, encourage and nurture the development of SoTL projects. The presentation will examine the website development thus far with active particpation from participants and request feedback from potential users to assist in the final stages of development of the website. Awareness and user feedback are two outcomes of this presentation.

Category: Meta-level studies and contributions to future scholarship

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Buffet Lunch
Saturday, November 12th from 12:30-1:30 pm
Castle/Assiniboine Rooms on the Mezzanine Level

Plenary Keynote Session
Saturday, November 12th from 1:30-3:00 pm

Saturday,
1:30-3:00 pm

Castle/Assiniboine Rooms
Mezzanine Level
Integrative paths in the scholarship of teaching and learning: a scientist’s journey
Kathy Takayama (Brown University)

What are the processes by which we uncover new perspectives, employ new approaches and discover novel applications in our scholarly work? How might such processes be applied to our pedagogical frameworks? The scholarship of teaching and learning creates opportunities for exploration of broader contexts beyond our disciplinary thinking. This presentation will map the ways in which new understandings of our disciplinary habits of mind can be revealed through interdisciplinary experiences. Such experiences foster integrative approaches to learning and provide a richer dialogue across disciplinary boundaries. In so doing, we prepare our students to be stewards of their own learning as they create meaningful contexts in multiple ways.

This keynote has been generously supported by Mount Royal University’s Academic Development Centre.

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For more information please contact the Institute for Scholarship of Teaching and Learning at sotlinstitute@mtroyal.ca or 403.440.5503